Egg Farms in Oregon

List of Egg Farms in Oregon – Find Suppliers and Egg Farmers Near You

Looking for egg farms in Oregon?

Whether you’re looking for a supplier or you’re interested in starting your own egg farm or egg selling business, Oregon is a great place for eggs!

Here is a list of some of the best egg farms and egg suppliers in the state of Oregon:

Egg Farms in Oregon

Egg FarmLocationPhoneWebsite
Willamette Egg Farms LLCCanby, OR503-651-0000willametteegg.com
Nest Best Egg CoWoodburn, OR503-981-8194NA
Great American EggPowell Butte, OR541-323-1065greatamericanegg.com
Cluckin’ Good Egg FarmOregon503-910-6640Facebook Page
Briggs FarmEugene, OR541-343-8183briggsfarm-107669.square.site
Knox Butte FarmsAlbany, OR541-974-3399NA
The Egg DropOR503-662-2102eggdroppdx.com
Thistle Family FarmCreswell, OR541-895-8972thistlefamilyfarm.com
Winn FarmsCorvallis, OR541-207-4541winnfarms.com
Skylane FarmsWoodburn, OR503-981-8487NA

Willamette Egg Farms LLC

Address – Canby, OR

Phone – 503-651-0000

Contact – NA

Website https://www.willametteegg.com/


Nest Best Egg Co

Address – Woodburn, OR

Phone – 503-981-8194

Contact – NA

Website – NA


Great American Egg

Address – Powell Butte, OR

Phone – 541-323-1065

Contact – NA

Website http://www.greatamericanegg.com/


Cluckin’ Good Egg Farm

Address – Oregon

Phone – 503-910-6640

Contact – NA

Website Facebook Page


Briggs Farm

Address – Eugene, OR

Phone – 541-343-8183

Contact – NA

Website https://briggsfarm-107669.square.site/


Knox Butte Farms

Address – Albany, OR

Phone – 541-974-3399

Contact – NA

Website – NA


The Egg Drop

Address – OR

Phone – 503-662-2102

Contact – NA

Website https://eggdroppdx.com/


Thistle Family Farm

Address – Creswell, OR

Phone – 541-895-8972

Contact – NA

Website https://www.thistlefamilyfarm.com/


Winn Farms

Address – Corvallis, OR

Phone – 541-207-4541

Contact – NA

Website http://www.winnfarms.com/


Skylane Farms

Address – Woodburn, OR

Phone – 503-981-8487

Contact – NA

Website – NA


Can I Sell Chicken Eggs in Oregon?

If you want to start selling eggs in the state of Oregon, you’ll need to be aware of the rules and regulations set by the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

I recommend starting with this; Rules and Regulations for the Oregon Shell Egg Producer document.

This document outlines the rules and regulations for selling shell eggs, which essentially means the things you need to know about how to sell chicken eggs lawfully.

It covers:

  • Egg handler’s licensing
  • Egg fees and egg permit numbers
  • How to properly label cartons and cases
  • Invocing
  • Safe handling instructions
  • How to candle and Grade eggs
  • And more.

Do I Need a License to Sell Chicken Eggs in Oregon?

The first thing most people want to know when they are considering selling eggs from their backyard flock or starting an egg farm is whether or not they need a license.

The rules on licensing in Oregon are as follows:

You are required to have an egg handler’s license if your eggs are to be sold at:

  • Retail establishments
  • Food service establishments
  • Food processors
  • and or food distributors

You do not need a license if your eggs are to be sold directly to the consumer (from the farm, farmers market, on route off producer’s farm directly to individual for home consumption).

Licensing isn’t something you can ignore, if you’re in doubt about your status you should always contact the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

Not All Eggs Are Equal

If you enjoy eggs – and I’m sure you do – you’ll be well aware there can be a huge difference in the taste and quality of one egg to another.

This is because not all eggs are equal – far from it.

The interesting thing is that the taste is not to do with the breed of the hen that laid the egg, it’s to do with how the hens are being treated at the farm.

At the least, you should always look for eggs that are labeled as ‘free range’ or ‘cage free’ as a starting point.

Caged or battery hens are generally kept in dire conditions. It’s a dated practice – that does still happen – but it’s cruel and inhumane to keep hens caged up all day.

Not only is it inhumane, but caged hens’ eggs suffer in quality as a result. The only ‘plus’, if you can call it that, is that these eggs cost less.

But trust me, it’s not worth saving a few pennies for eggs that taste so much worse than ethically produced eggs.

In addition to this, hens deserve to have excellent living conditions. They should be treated well, fed a good quality feed, and have a high standard of care.

Happy chickens are healthy chickens, and healthy chickens lay the best eggs. This is why I always look into how egg farms treat their chickens.

You’ll notice that any farm with ethical and healthy practices will be proud to talk about it on their site and plaster it all over their egg boxes.

Find an Egg Farm Near You: State Listings

Resources

Image credits – Photo by Mads Eneqvist on Unsplash

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