Egg Farms in New Jersey

List of Egg Farms in New Jersey – Find Eggs For Sale Near You!

Looking for egg farms in New Jersey?

There are some great egg farms and suppliers in New Jersey, both in the way of small, family-run farms and larger egg farming operations.

Below, I’ve put together a list of some of the best sellers and egg farms in New Jersey:

Egg Farms in New Jersey

Egg FarmLocationPhoneWebsite
Puglisi Egg FarmHowell Township, NJ732-938-2373puglisiegg.com
East Coast Egg FarmersNorth Bergen, NJ201-869-6121NA
Ralph’s Egg FarmBlairstown, NJ908-362-7573NA
Stephan L. Green Egg FarmFarmingdale, NJNANA
Schuster’s Poultry FarmLakewood, NJ732-363-0641NA
Polnasek Poultry FarmHillsborough Township, NJ908-420-2575Facebook Page
Macopin FarmWest Milford, NJ973-697-3578macopinfarm.com
Springstone Organic FarmHowell Township, NJ732-774-7444springstonefarm.org
Sourland FarmHillsborough Township, NJ908-336-8139NA
FAR Wind Farm, LLCWilliamstown, NJ609-774-0629NA

Puglisi Egg Farm

Address – Howell Township, NJ

Phone – 732-938-2373

Contact – NA

Website https://www.puglisiegg.com/


East Coast Egg Farmers

Address – North Bergen, NJ

Phone – 201-869-6121

Contact – NA

Website – NA


Ralph’s Egg Farm

Address – Blairstown, NJ

Phone – 908-362-7573

Contact – NA

Website – NA


Stephan L. Green Egg Farm

Address – Farmingdale, NJ

Phone – NA

Contact – NA

Website – NA


Schuster’s Poultry Farm

Address – Lakewood, NJ

Phone – 732-363-0641

Contact – NA

Website – NA


Polnasek Poultry Farm

Address – Hillsborough Township, NJ

Phone – 908-420-2575

Contact – NA

Website Facebook Page


Macopin Farm

Address – West Milford, NJ

Phone – 973-697-3578

Contact – NA

Website http://www.macopinfarm.com/


Springstone Organic Farm

Address – Howell Township, NJ

Phone – 732-774-7444

Contact – NA

Website http://www.springstonefarm.org/


Sourland Farm

Address – Hillsborough Township, NJ

Phone – 908-336-8139

Contact – NA

Website – NA


FAR Wind Farm, LLC

Address – Williamstown, NJ

Phone – 609-774-0629

Contact – NA

Website – NA


Can I Sell Chicken Eggs in New Jersey?

If you’re interested in selling eggs in New Jersey, you have to make yourself aware of the laws, rules, and regulations that you need to follow.

The best place to start to find out how to act lawfully is the New Jersey Department of Agriculture.

If you’re going to produce organic eggs, I recommend reading the Egg Production Guidance for Producers here.

This document helps to explain some of the requirements for certifying organic egg production and provides some useful information.

Another resource I recommend reading is the Minimum Food Safety Requirements for Product Sales Farm Markets and Community Farmers’ Markets.

This document covers a lot of the regulations for lawfully selling eggs at farmers’ markets. It covers some of the most important aspects in regards to safely producing, handling, and selling eggs, such as:

  • Container in which eggs are sold shall contain: Name and address of the producer/packer; the word “eggs”; grade of the eggs; size-weight class of the eggs; numerical count of the contents, nutritional label.
  • ¾ Eggs shall be packed in a clean container; if the container is reused it shall be cleaned and relabeled by producer/packer.
  • ¾ Temperature shall be maintained at or below 45°F.
  • ¾ Eggs shall not be cooled directly on ice or water.

Not All Eggs Are Equal!

If you enjoy eggs – and I’m sure you do – you’ll be well aware there can be a huge difference in the taste and quality of an egg.

Not all eggs are equal – far from it.

It’s not to do with the breed of the hen that laid the egg, either, it’s to do with how the hens are being treated at the farm.

You should always look for eggs that are labeled as ‘free range’ or ‘cage free’ as a starting point.

Caged or battery hens are generally kept in dire conditions. It’s a dated practice – that does still happen – but it’s cruel and inhumane to keep hens caged up all day.

Not only is it inhumane, but caged hens also produce eggs that are lacking in taste and nutritional content.

Trust me, when you’ve put a caged egg to the test against an egg produced by a free-range hen, you’ll never go back.

In addition to this, hens should have excellent living conditions, a good quality feed, and a high standard of care.

Happy chickens are healthy chickens, and healthy chickens lay the best eggs. It’s really as simple as that.

Find an Egg Farm Near You: State Listings

Resources

Image credits – Photo by Mads Eneqvist on Unsplash

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