Chicken Hatchery Washington

List of Chicken Hatcheries in Washington | Chicks for Sale

Looking for a chicken hatchery in Washington state to buy chicks, hatching eggs, or chickens?

I’ve done some research and listed all the hatcheries I was able to confirm are currently trading to help you out.

As well as some additional resources and online hatcheries to help you connect with poultry breeders and sellers in the state of Washington.

Take a look at the following listings, hopefully, you’ll find what you’re looking for – good luck!

Chicken Hatchery Washington Listing

Hatchery/Farm NameLocationPhoneWebsite
Baxter BarnFall City, WA425-765-7883https://baxterbarn.org/
Garden SphereTacoma, WA253-761-7936https://www.gardensphere.biz/
Inspiration PlantationRidgefield, WA503-997-8757http://www.inspirationplantation.com/
Stokesberry Sustainable FarmOlympia, WA360-485-2558http://www.stokesberrysustainablefarm.com/
Spring Leaf FarmSpokane, WA509-939-9015http://www.springleaffarm.com/

Baxter Barn

Address – Fall City, WA

Phone – 425-765-7883

Contact – baxterbarn@hotmail.com

Website https://baxterbarn.org/


Garden Sphere

Address – Tacoma, WA

Phone – 253-761-7936

Contact – customerservice@gardensphere.biz

Website https://www.gardensphere.biz/


Inspiration Plantation

Address – Ridgefield, WA

Phone – 503-997-8757

Contact – inspirationplantation@gmail.com

Website http://www.inspirationplantation.com/


Stokesberry Sustainable Farm

Address – Olympia, WA

Phone – 360-485-2558

Contact – jstokesberry@olywa.net

Website http://www.stokesberrysustainablefarm.com/


Spring Leaf Farm

Address – Spokane, WA

Phone – 509-939-9015

Contact – springleaffarm@comcast.net

Website http://www.springleaffarm.com/


Additional Resources

If you’ve not been able to find what you’re looking for, you could try joining the Rare & Quality Poultry Facebook Group.

This group was started by Rainier Creek Poultry, a farm located in Enumclaw, Washington. It’s a place where poultry enthusiasts in Washington can meet and talk about all things chicks.

Online Hatcheries

If you can’t find chicks for sale locally, there are some great online hatcheries that will likely have what you’re looking for.

They stock a much wider range of poultry breeds, and you can order hatching eggs or chicks by mail.

Here are a few of the best online hatcheries I’ve personally had experience with or know people who have used them:

McMurray Hatchery – I’ve heard a lot of good things about McMurray Hatchery, so I’m happy to recommend them. Plus, I’ve just noticed on their site they have some French Black Copper Marans, anyone for chocolate brown color eggs!?

Cackle Hatchery – With more than 200 varieties of poultry for sale on their site, there’s a good chance you’ll find what you’re looking for. 

Stromberg’s Chickens – Stromberg’s is another online hatchery that I’ve only heard good things about. They have a huge range of breeds and equipment to choose from. They also produce some useful blog content which is helpful for new backyard flock owners.

Tips to Help Prepare for Your New Chicks

It’s imperative that you’re well prepared for your chicks and have all the equipment you’ll need to care for them.

Honestly, it’s more fun than it is difficult. With a little research and forward planning, you’ll be fine. Here are the basics you need to be aware of:

Housing – You’ll need a brooder to keep your chicks safe and warm. A brooder is just an enclosure designed to house chicks.

You can either buy one or make one from a box, tank or something similar. They’ll live here for 6-8 weeks before they can be moved to their coop outdoors.

Feeding – Chicks grow up fast, and to do so they have some complex dietary requirements. There are some great starter feeds on the market that will make sure they’re getting all the nutrition they need.

Drinking water – Chick waterers are designed to hold water at a low height they can easily access. While having a lip to stop bedding being flicked into the water as much as possible.

Warmth – Chicks need some help keeping warm until they’ve grown their juvenile feathers. The easiest way is with a heat lamp facing into their brooder.

Start with 90-95 degrees for the first week, and reduce the temperature by 5 degrees a week for 6 or so weeks until they’re able to keep themselves warm enough.