Chicken Hatchery Alaska

Chicken Hatchery Alaska: List of Places to Buy Chickens

Looking for chicken hatcheries in Alaska to start or add to your backyard chicken flock?

There isn’t a lot of hatcheries and farms selling new chicks or eggs to hatch at home as far as I can find.

I’ve put together a list of the places I was able to find blow. I hope you find what you’re looking for!

Chicken Hatchery Alaska Listing

Hatchery/Farm NameLocationPhoneWebsite
Alaska Mill Feed & Garden CenterAnchorage, AK907-276-6016alaskamillandfeed.com
Frosted Feather FarmWasilla, AK907-841-9271Facebook Page
Luke’s Poultry RanchWasilla, AK907-864-0886localhens.com

Alaska Mill Feed & Garden Center

Address – Anchorage, AK

Phone – 907-276-6016

Contact – info@alaskamillandfeed.com

Website https://www.alaskamillandfeed.com/


Frosted Feather Farm

Address – Wasilla, AK

Phone – 907-841-9271

Contact – Via Facebook

Website Facebook Page


Luke’s Poultry Ranch

Address – Wasilla, AK

Phone – 907-864-0886

Contact – NA

Website https://localhens.com/


Online Hatcheries

Didn’t find a hatchery nearby above? Buying online is a great way to find the type or breed of chicken you’re looking for without even having to leave your home!

The hatchery I’m always happy to recommend is Cackle Hatchery. I’ve used them myself and found their customer service – and chicks – to be awesome. They stock hundreds of breeds, can ship out chicks and hatching eggs across the U.S. and have great prices.

You can check the latest availability and pricing at Cackle Hatchery by clicking here.

Additional Resources

If you can’t find what you’re looking for at any of the farms and hatcheries above, you can browse ad listings on Alaskaslist here.

There is usually a long list of chickens and chicks for sale. Just keep in mind that almost all of these listings are from backyard chicken owners and not professional breeders.

Therefore you need to be really careful as they’re not NPIP certified.


Tips – What to Look for When Buying Chicks

Hatching eggs at home or picking up chicks and chickens is loads of fun.

It’s easy to get carried away, though. You do have to remember that you’re buying animals, so you need to be prepared both with what to look for and how to care for them.

Here are some basic tips to help you out when buying chicks:

  • When viewing chicks, take a good look at the farm of hatchery selling them to ensure they care for their animals.
  • Check the chicks over thoroughly too, look at their eyes, nostrils, and vent areas for any signs of discharge or dirt.
  • Pay close attention to how they’re breathing. Breathing issues with chicks are often the first sign of disease or other health issues.
  • Ask the owners about vaccinations and how they look after their chicks,
  • Check they are NPIP certified.
  • Take a look for reviews online from previous customers. Don’t be concerned if you can’t find any, it’s more so the negative ones you should be worried about.
  • If they look and sound healthy and you’re happy with the surroundings, go ahead and bring them home.

Tips for Raising Chickens in Alaska

Alaska isn’t the most popular state for keeping backyard chickens. This is because there are two challenges facing Alaskan residents; the extremely cold winters, and predators.

You’re going to need to insulate their coop, and you might even need to provide heating. You’ll need to check what temperatures you’re expecting in the winter and adapt accordingly.

This video takes you through some steps on how you can ensure your chickens are warm, safe and happy throughout the harsh Alaskan winter.

It includes a cool way to stop their water freezing, molting chickens wearing coats, and some other useful tips!

Look for NPIP Certified Hatcheries

You may have noticed some hatcheries advertising themselves as NPIP certified. NPIP stands for National Poultry Improvement Plan and is a voluntary certification business’s selling chickens can join.

It’s like a stamp of approval that shows they use best practices when breeding chickens. It’s some added guarantee for you as a buyer that they do everything they can to check for and avoid diseases.

It’s not a legal requirement, so not all hatcheries will be NPIP certified. Individual sellers on ad listings most likely won’t be.